Fame or Fortune

by jmac on

helping-hand1

Do you do what you do for FAME or FORTUNE; or neither?

Out of these 3 options of Fame or Fortune below,which one do you choose? Digging in more; why do you choose what you choose for the idea of reason of choice? A better explanation I guess is which would you get the most please from?

Receive zero financial gain become super famous for being a movie star, a Olympic Athlete, or curing CANCER. *Note: Let’s assume in this scenario you do succeed developing a cure for cancer|people but you want no one to give you any financial reward.*

or

Be famous and get $300k, but you have no control over what your fame is for until after you pick it. Example: you get a 50/50 chance of being a celebrity that people know and want an autograph from you. Being a “celebrity” reaping both sides of the benefits such as sitting at the Oscars rubbing shoulders with other famous celebrities. Also getting financial advice from Warren Buffett and other successful financiers. Please Note* choose you dream situation on who you want to sit next to and have mentors as.*

or

Receive $300,000 absolutely free and clear, and you’ll never be famous in your lifetime for anything but you will be respected based on your choices on what you do with that $300,000!?

My answer is very easy for me but I really really want me readers think about this hypothetical situation! This example is really close to winning the lottery for half of lottery winners do not have a mentor a or a board of mentors to guide them on how to manage that received money. I, for I will battle cancer because I have it would want to help prevent cancer and/or any other disease. That is my goal to give something back that’s much much bigger than myself. If you have had or have cancer you know what I’ am saying and if not just try to imagine the most traumatic, best, most growth as a person you will ever experience! ;)

Now you choose just one!

Out of curiosity, What option did you choose?  I know I personally can not live with fame for I watched a very close friend grow up to be a very different individual than when we first met and that experience which she nor I was ready for, turned out very tragic o the emotional level. It also didn’t turn out to be the kind of life or lifestyle I really wanted nor I had respect for. I like and love living my life with out the pressures that being a famous celebrity and even so I really like living my life on the down low not to mention and you can do a lot with $300,000! Especially if you surround yourself with mentors that have your best interest in mind with their hands not in your pocket collecting your hard worked with long hours to get you in front of the so called right people.

live.life.love

- jmmlife.com

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Fear is Fear

by jmac on

“Only Thing We Have to Fear Is Fear Itself”: FDR’s First Inaugural Address

Franklin D. Roosevelt had campaigned against Herbert Hoover in the 1932 presidential election by saying as little as possible about what he might do if elected. Through even the closest working relationships, none of the president-elect’s most intimate associates felt they knew him well, with the exception perhaps of his wife, Eleanor. The affable, witty Roosevelt used his great personal charm to keep most people at a distance. In campaign speeches, he favored a buoyant, optimistic, gently paternal tone spiced with humor. But his first inaugural address took on an unusually solemn, religious quality. And for good reason—by 1933 the depression had reached its depth. Roosevelt’s first inaugural address outlined in broad terms how he hoped to govern and reminded Americans that the nation’s “common difficulties” concerned “only material things.”

What made Franklin D. Roosevelt feel that prompted his emotional feeling to say these words. Was it the fact that stock market just crashed only 3 years earlier? Is it because FDR was telling the people of the United States of America at that time of boom in the Industrial revolution for some motivation to the people? Was he unconsciously consciously putting some valuable knowledge on the word that is fear?

If my readers like the acronym of F.E.A.R. here is a picture to for you to read and hopefully understand!

FEAR

Fear is a made up word and you learned this word from your society, the nature of how you grew up, nurturing or who raised you and what are their belief systems and origin of those unconscious learned systems, and we can go on and on but I think you get the point. Fear is exactly what it means,”FALSE EVIDENCE APPEARING REAL.”

live with out fear for faith in something and fear in something cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Which one do you choose; FAITH or FEAR?

live.life.love

- jmmlife.com

 

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stairway to heaven

Does TIME heal all wounds?

I was thinking about my time on this earth and asked my self, “does time heal wounds?” I my personal opinion no time does not heal wounds of emotional of based seriousness does not heal physical wounds. The reason behind my own pondering question comes from my own nurture; my upbringing from what parents told me, and nature; or where I was raised. This also stems the question of what do you value your life being? Being what, the rebuttal might be, and what do you mean? Who and better yet, what have I been learning from some of mentors in life and my own self worth is what I mean!

I give you this article online today for that it seems to be super inspirational and give a basis to all my readers and follows of what I am being in my life. What have your struggles been and it is your choice to as “THEY” say build a bridge and get over it? Read below for more information to this interesting topic of the day!

Unknown said:

“As a counselor who specializes in end-of-life and bereavement matters, I often hear of people giving bereaved people advice similar to “you just need some time, after all ‘time heals all wounds.’” It is as if these well-meaning people are saying: “Just sit back and in time you’ll no longer have the sadness, anguish, yearning, guilt, anger, and fear you’re feeling now. They’ll fade away, and you’ll be fine.” Wow! What an interesting concept! But wait a minute, that approach to grieving raises a couple of questions. First, how long is “some time” – two months, one year, two years, five years? The second question is why doesn’t this apply to the rest of our lives? After all, we have to look for a new job, search for the right house, study to get through school. Even if we want to win the lottery, we still have to buy the ticket. We have to take the initiative to do something to cause something else to happen. Is grief different? Can it really be true that time alone is enough for grief to go away? I don’t think so and let me give you an example why.

Last year, a bright, highly-educated, articulate young woman came into my office six years after her father had suddenly died. My new client told me she was working two jobs, one of which was heading up a new company she had started. She described how she had found it very difficult to talk, or even think, about her father without bursting into tears. To keep herself “under control,” she kept herself frantically busy. She threw herself into her work, taking on tasks others wouldn’t do, answering email and writing proposals until late at night, and traveling on most weekends. At home, she spent hours cleaning and straightening up her apartment so it looked like a picture out of a magazine. One thing she did that really irritated her new fiancee was that she spent hours folding and re-folding towels and then aligning and realigning them in the linen closet until they were just right. She was doing whatever she could to distract herself from acknowledging what she already knew – her father had died. She was running from her grief.

She finally realized she had to do something because she couldn’t continue this way after she married and had children. Her first attempt at addressing her situation was to attend a Loss of Parent bereavement support group. However, she could go only once. As she later told me, she was embarrassed that she was in the same place in her mourning as others whose parent had died only six months earlier. It was as if her mourning had gone no further from where it was 5.5 years ago. She was stuck, and no more time would have eased or erased her grief. Time had done nothing for her; time had NOT been her friend.

After six months of counseling she worked through what she had been running from for over 5 years and found peace with her father’s death. Her frantic behaviors have ceased and now, she is a fully functioning young woman with plans for getting married next year.”

The point here, though, is that time does NOT heal all wounds. A more apt saying is “IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH THE TIME THAT HEALS.” Like any other aspect of life, mourning is an active, working process, and is not a passive one that you can just deny.
“Keep climbing my friends & do not have F.E.A.R to look down for remember your goals to help you go to the TOP!”
live.life.love
- jmmlife.com

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